Alexander James Wood @ Line Gallery

Currently on show at SVA’s Line Gallery are Alexander James Wood’s A1 and A0 screen prints. Overwhelming the small exhibition space with their vivid colours and graphic style, it could be easy to overlook the little details that really add depth and character to these pieces, choosing instead to focus on the artist’s skilled craftsmanship […]

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ARTIST ROOMS On Tour: Bill Viola

Bill Viola’s work is mesmerising; both in terms of its content and its unique aesthetic. At The Wilson Gallery in Cheltenham, three works from Viola’s The Passions series are showcased in a small darkened room, their glowing presence evoking an eerie yet oddly calming sensation made incongruous by the busy shops and noisy streets outside. Moving […]

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Love Is Enough: William Morris & Andy Warhol

‘Love is Enough’ ran from April 25th – September 6th 2015 at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery and my review of this exhibition was published last July by online film, music, style and art magazine, Kolekto. Unfortunately, I no longer have access to the images that ran alongside this piece, but you can still see them here. When thinking about […]

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Do Ho Suh: New York City Apartment/Bristol

Another review from the Kolekto back catalogue. Installed from March 28th until September 27th this year, Do Ho Suh’s ‘New York City Apartment/Bristol’ was brought to Bristol Museum and Art Gallery in association with local contemporary arts centre, Arnolfini. Displacement is not a new emotion. Perhaps we have all experienced it to a greater or lesser […]

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Open for Business

This year I had the wonderful opportunity to write for Kolekto Magazine, an online publication focusing on film, music, art and style. Whilst working for Kolekto’s art department, I produced four in-depth reviews of exhibitions in Birmingham, Bristol and New York. Unfortunately, Kolekto closed its virtual doors in August, but despite the sadness of this […]

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Artist Profile: Trav

How amazing is this picture?! Last month Kolekto Magazine celebrated its third birthday and in honour of reaching this magnificent milestone, six talented illustrators immortalised the sixteen members of Kolekto’s writing team in a series of portraits that aptly reflect the publication’s individuality and diversity. My portrait is by the brilliant Trav who featured as […]

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Review: Edward Scissorhands (2005) & Steamboat Bill Jr. (1928)

How important are words? As a writer, I consider words to be imperative to my existence; without words, my stories are a blank page. And yet, it is possible to build a narrative without these basic tools, to draw in your audience with characters who remain believable despite their silence. Perhaps then, my opening question […]

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Review: Midnight in Paris (2011)

Whilst I can appreciate that film reviews are generally written in and around a picture’s release date, what aspiring writer/blogger wouldn’t want to discuss a storyline based on the plight of a struggling novelist and his nightly escapades with Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald? And so, as a starting point for what I hope […]

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Review: Truth and Memory

Truth and Memory: British Art of the First World War The First World War Galleries at the Imperial War Museum are awe-inspiring. Or perhaps that’s not the right word. Terrifying might be a better one. As the viewer snakes their way chronologically through the events before, after and during 1914-1918, it is easy to become […]

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Review: A Real Birmingham Family

What is a family? The Oxford Dictionary cites the word family as meaning: 1. A group consisting of two parents and their children living together as a unit. 2. All the descendants of a common ancestor. 3. A group of related things. But in today’s society are any of these definitions particularly accurate? In Birmingham, […]

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Review: Broken Ensemble

Imagine it’s 1854. Imagine you’re sat astride your horse. Imagine your heart pounding, hands shaking as you prepare to face your enemy. Imagine death as a near-certainty. Imagine waiting, waiting, waiting; and then… At Eastside Projects in Digbeth, Birmingham, a slow mournful note can be heard. It echoes around the empty gallery space, climbing the […]

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Review: Being Human

What would Roald Dahl’s characters have been without Quentin Blake? Charlie would still have won his golden ticket; Matilda would still have overcome Miss Trunchbull; and Danny would still be champion of the world. Nevertheless, as soon as we imagine Danny in his caravan or Matilda in her classroom or an awe-struck Charlie in Willy […]

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Sheila Hancock – A New Debut

Even famous people feel intimidated, or so I’m told. Still, it’s hard to picture an Olivier award-winning actress cowering in the corner of a literature festival green room, isn’t it? And yet… The evening began wet and noisy. Rain bounced off the roof of The Times Forum tent at Cheltenham’s Literature Festival and almost as […]

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Nick Hornby Versus Cultural Snobbery

Literature; let’s think about that word. For an aspiring writer such as myself (particularly one with no appropriate qualifications in the subject), the word literature prompts a small hiccup of anxiety, one that has me pushing myself back in my seat and sidling my pen away in embarrassment. For your average reader, literature – defined […]

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Review: Crucible2 – From Art to Angels

                                       I love Gloucester Cathedral; the cold air, the bare stone, the architecture, the history. Awe-inspiring from the outside as well as in, the magnificent structure could be considered art in its own right; a sculpture, perhaps, on the grandest of scales. Fitting […]

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